SBR Student Conference Travel Award

The Society of Bead Researchers has established a Student Conference Travel Award to assist undergraduate or graduate students to travel to a national or international conference to present a paper on some aspect of bead research. The award is for $500 and the applicant must be enrolled in a BA, MA, or PhD degree-granting program anywhere in the world. They also need to be a current member of the Society for Bead Researchers. (https://beadresearch.org/membership)

To apply for the award, you must submit the following:

1) Title and abstract (300 word limit) of your presentation;

2) Letter of acceptance from the conference where you plan to present the paper;

2) A brief statement outlining how your presentation expands our knowledge of beads and their role in society, and how your participation in the conference will be beneficial to your career and future research; and

3) Your CV, including your contact information, and the name and email of your faculty advisor.

Send the above material to Karlis Karklins (karlis4444@gmail.com), head of the Award’s Committee. The deadline for submissions for conferences in late 2019 and early 2020 is September 15, 2019. (Now extended to September 30, 2019.)

The awardee will be selected by the Executive Committee of the SBR on the basis of originality, scholarship, and relevance to the overall mission of the SBR (https://beadresearch.org/about-us/).

Applicants will be notified about the results of the award competition as soon as possible after the committee meets to decide on the award.

Award Winners

Our first award recipient is K. Pierce Wright, a master’s student in the Anthropology Department, The University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa. His winning paper, “Beads and Bohr Models: Using XRF to Discuss Choctaw Identity Formation,” was presented at the 84th Annual Meeting of the Society of American Archaeology held in Albuquerque, New Mexico, in April of 2019. It presents the results of an x-ray fluorescence (XRF) study to examine European glass trade beads from two Chickasawhay Creek Sites in Kemper County, Mississippi. Together, these two sites present a unique opportunity to examine Choctaw ethnogenesis. By using a practice-based approach, this paper discusses the application of chemical characterization analyses in bead studies to establish more accurate dates of occupation, discuss body adornment and identity, and examine Choctaw-French interaction during the 18th century.